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PHSE and RSE

Mrs Jones is the PSHE and RSE Coordinator. 

RSE stands for “relationships and sex education” and as part of Relationships and Health Education, is a new approach to teaching children about relationships and health.

The Relationships Education, RSE, and Health Education (England) Regulations 2019 have made Relationships Education compulsory in all primary schools. Sex education is not compulsory in primary schools.

All primary school children will be required to learn about relationships and health. Relationships and Health Education comprises two distinct areas:

  • Relationships
  • Physical health and mental wellbeing

 

Why is there a new RSE curriculum in 2020?

The current curriculum has not been updated for 20 years. So much change has happened since then. Children need to learn what is relevant to them and the world they are growing up in.

The new Relationships and Health Education 2020 curriculum is designed to:

  • Help all children grow up healthy, happy and safe.
  • Give all children the knowledge to make informed decisions about their wellbeing, health and relationships.
  • Support all children to manage the challenges and opportunities of modern Britain.
  • Prepare all children for a successful adult lives.

 

Teaching relationships in primary education

The relationships part of the new curriculum will teach the children what they need to learn to build positive and safe relationships:

  • With family.
  • With friends.
  • Online.

At Redscope, we will teach in a way that is appropriate to the children’s ages and will look at the following questions:

  • What is a relationship?
  • What is friendship?
  • What is family?
  • Who can children look to for support?

 

What will children be taught by the end of primary school?

By the time your child finishes at Redscope primary school, they will have been taught about the following in Relationships Education:

  • Family and people who care for them.
  • Caring friendships.
  • Respectful relationships.
  • Online relationships.
  • Being safe.

 

Physical health and mental wellbeing in primary schools

The physical health and mental wellbeing part of the new RSE curriculum will teach the children how to:

  • Make good decisions about their own health and wellbeing.
  • Recognise issues in themselves.
  • Recognise issue in others.
  • Seek support as early as possible when issues arise.

By the time children finish Redscope primary school, they will have been taught about the following:

  • Mental wellbeing.
  • Internet safety and harms.
  • Physical health and fitness.
  • Healthy eating.
  • Facts about drugs, alcohol and drugs and the risks
    associated with them.
  • Health and prevention of illness.
  • Basic first aid.
  • Changes to the adolescent body.

 

Can parents withdraw their children from the new RSE Curriculum?

Parents cannot withdraw their child from any part of the Relationships and Health Education aspects of the RSE curriculum. It is important for ALL children to be taught the content on such essential matters like friendships and keeping safe.

Although sex education is not formally taught in primary schools, puberty is taught in school as part of the primary science curriculum. Remember that the science curriculum in all maintained schools includes content on human development, which includes human reproduction, and there is no right for a parent to withdraw their child from the science curriculum.

To see a copy of our RSE Policy please click on the link below.

How is PSHE and RSE taught in our school?

Personal, Social, and Health Education enables pupils to develop the knowledge and understanding, skills, attitudes and values which are necessary for them to make sense of the responsibilities, opportunities and experiences which are part of their lives, both now & in the future. PSHE enables children to become healthy, independent and responsible members of society. We encourage our pupils to play a positive role in contributing to the life of the school and the wider community. In so doing we help their sense of self worth. We teach them how society is organised and governed. We ensure that they experience the process of democracy in school through the school council. We teach them about rights and responsibilities. They learn to appreciate what it means to be a positive member of a diverse multicultural society.

 

PSHE and RSE are taught in a variety of ways both within and outside the curriculum. In some instances, aspects of PSHE and RSE may be taught as a discreet subject, and to a large extent it can be covered through other subjects and topics. However, we advocate that PSHE and RSE features within the Primary curriculum as a discrete lesson, varying between 30 – 45 mins, depending upon the age of the children being taught and the aspect of the subject being delivered.

PSHE and RSE is also developed through activities, assemblies & whole-school events. For example, a residential visit to Caythorpe Court in Lincolnshire is offered in Key Stage 2, where there is a particular focus on developing pupils’ self esteem & giving them opportunities to develop leadership & co-operative skills. In addition, Year 6 pupils annually visit Crucial Crew which is a purpose built facility with a focus on the Police, First aid, internet safety, fire safety and anti social behaviour.

Responses to the Parental Questionnaire

 

It is a government requirement that schools consult with parents before the new Relationships and Health Education curriculum is taught. Unfortunately, Covid restrictions prevented us from inviting parents and carers into school so, with this in mind, we used a parental questionnaire to gather views and provide information about the RSHE curriculum. Below, you will find the questions and responses from this questionnaire.

 

 

Many of our parents had not yet read our school’s Relationships and Health Education Policy. You can find it using this link: https://primarysite-prod-sorted.s3.amazonaws.com/redscope/UploadedDocument/6f2941fc3edc40ff90b75872e3694105/ccat-joint-rhe-policy-nov-2020.pdf

 

4. Please tick the themes that you think will be part of the new PSHE curriculum.

 

Friendships  *                                             Healthy relationships *

Keeping ourselves safe *                                                 First aid *

Being healthy, including mentally healthy *             Online safety *

How we grow and change *                                             Feelings *

Our support network *

 

Many of our parents identified the themes which are taught in the scheme. You may be interested to know that the topics listed above are all taught in our RSHE lessons. On this PSHE page, you will find an overview of what is taught in each year group in PSHE/RSHE lessons. However, as a school we are committed to providing the most relevant learning experiences for our children and, with this is mind, your child’s teacher may have prioritised some aspects of the scheme and taught them in a slightly different order from how it is set out.

 

5. Are there any additional areas that you think should be taught within our PSHE curriculum?        

Below are some of the suggestions from our parents about what should be included in our PSHE/RSHE lessons. We are pleased to say that they are all covered at some point in the primary phase.

‘Bullying’ – In every year group, the children learn about bullying, why it sometimes happens, what to do about it and its effect on people. We also celebrate Anti-Bullying Week every November.

‘Inclusion – awareness of people who are differently-abled and have additional needs’children are taught about discrimination, kindness and empathy throughout the primary phase.

‘Politics’ – The children are taught about democracy and how the law affects them during our citizenship lessons.

‘Hate crimes’ – children are taught about tolerance during our citizenship lessons and are also taught about hate crimes during their visit to Crucial Crew in Y6. In addition to this, PC Paul (our local PCSO) visits us regularly to talk to the children about being responsible citizens in our community.

‘Looking after our teeth and sleep’ - children are taught about both of these things during our health lessons and this is also part of our science curriculum. In Y3, the children are visited by a dentist and learn all about how to look after their teeth.

‘Road safety’the children learn about road safety at various points during the primary phase and this is also part of the RSHE curriculum. We are supported by the South Yorkshire Safer Roads Partnership in teaching this each year. We also arrange regular visits from the RNLI so that the children can learn about water safety, and South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue to talk about fire safety.

‘Money management/coping in the real world’this is taught as part of the citizenship element of RSHE and also during our maths lessons, where we try to link our learning to real life as much as possible.

‘Grief/separating families’ – both of these themes are addressed during RSHE lessons around ‘coping with strong feelings’.

‘Consent/body autonomy’ – children are taught about self-respect, consent and appropriate relationships during our RSHE lessons.

 

 

 

6. Please use this section to make any further comments or to ask questions.

 

Almost half of the parents who responded to our questionnaire would like to attend a parents’ meeting about our PSHE/RSHE lessons. Many used the questions section to ask if they could be informed about what would be taught when so that they could be prepared for questions at home and could possibly decide whether or not to withdraw their children from the lessons. Please refer to the section on this page entitled ‘What is taught in each year group?’ for more information about PSHE/RSHE lessons on your child’s class. We have also included some example lessons on this page.

 

Please be aware that  parents cannot legally withdraw their child from any part of the Relationships and Health Education aspects of the RSE curriculum. It is important for ALL children to be taught the content on such essential matters like friendships and keeping safe. Parents do have a right to withdraw their children from sex education but this is not formally taught in primary schools. However, puberty is taught in school as part of the primary science curriculum. Remember that the science curriculum in all maintained schools includes content on human development, which includes human reproduction, and there is no right for a parent to withdraw their child from the science curriculum.

 

Another point raised in this section was how children with SEND be supported during these lessons. This is addressed on page 13 of our school policy. Our RHSE curriculum is inclusive and all children have a right to access the content taught. However, wherever possible, we will make reasonable adjustments to promote accessibility and to adapt teaching methods to deliver the programme appropriately to all children.

 

 

What is taught in each year group and when?

 

Below, you will find an overview from each year group, showing what is taught in our RSHE lessons and when. Please be aware that, as a school, we are committed to providing the most relevant learning experiences for our children and, with this is mind, your child’s teacher may have prioritised some aspects of the scheme and taught them in a slightly different order from how it is set out in the table.

 

Year 1

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1.1

 

The caring school

and

Feelings, friends and friendships

5 lessons

Term 1.2

 

Focus on special people

and

Anti-bullying

6 lessons

Term 2.1

 

Healthy eating and hygiene

6 lessons

 

 

Term 2.2

 

Physical health and wellbeing

6 lessons

 

 

Term 3.1

 

Growing and changing

2 lessons

 

 

Term 3.2

 

Keeping myself safe

6 lessons

 

 

Term 3.3

 

The world of drugs

4 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

H1g

Isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support.

R1c

That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care.

R2a

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

R2b

The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

R2c

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

To recognise ways in which we can promote a caring trusting environment.

To see ourselves as a valued and valuable member of the school community.

 

Learning Objectives:

H3a

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

H4a

What constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content)?

H4b

The principles of planning and preparing a range of healthy meals.

H6d

About dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist.

H6e

About personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H3a

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

H2b

The benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and other’s mental and physical well-being.

H3b

The importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this; for example walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile or other forms of regular, vigorous exercise.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

H1e

The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service- based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

H6c

The importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

 

Learning Objectives:

R5a

What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

R5c

That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact.

Lifecycles

To recognise how they are growing and changing.

 

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

H6b

About safe and unsafe exposure to the sun, and how to reduce the risk of sun damage, including skin cancer.

R2e

How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

R4c

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

To develop skills to keep themselves safe.

 

Learning Objectives:

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

H7b

Concepts of basic first aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

To help children understand their role in the safe handling of medicines and substance.

To recognise that substances can affect our bodies.

 

 

Year 2

 

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1

 

The caring school

and

Feelings and relationships

10 lessons

Term 2.1

 

Healthy lifestyles

6 lessons

 

 

Term 2.2

 

Growing and changing

4 lessons

 

 

Term 3.1

 

Keeping myself safe

5 lessons

 

 

Term 3.2

 

The world of drugs

6 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

R1a

That families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability.

R2a

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

R2b

The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

R2c

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

R2d

That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

R3f

About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

R3g

What a stereotype is and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R1c

That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care.

H1g

Isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1h

That bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

H2e

That the internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.

To understand that different influences can affect choices.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H6c

The importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

H6d

About dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist.

H4a

What constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content)?

H4c

The characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

H3b

The importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this; for example walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile or other forms of regular, vigorous exercise.

H6e

About personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

H2b

About the benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content on their own and other’s mental and physical wellbeing   

 

Learning Objectives:

R5c

That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

To recognise their own growing competencies and responsibilities.

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

R5b

About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe.

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

H7b

Concepts of basic first aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online           

R4c

The rules and principles of keeping safe online, how to recognize risk, haramful content and contact and how to report them    

To know people who help them and how to ask for help.

To know the difference between safe and dangerous places to play and how accidents can happen.

To understand the responsibility involved in making choices.

To recognise how to keep themselves safe.

 

Learning Objectives:

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

To know when to say no.

To extend understanding of what goes into their bodies, how it enters and its impact.

To understand the role of medicines and health.

 

 

Year 3

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1.1

 

The caring school

and

Feelings, friends and friendships

6 lessons

Term 1.2

 

Relationships, loss and separation

6 lessons

 

 

Term 2.1

 

Choices, emotions and difference

6 lessons

 

 

Term 2.2

 

My healthy body – Taking responsibility for my healthy lifestyle

6 lessons

 

Term 3.1

 

Keeping myself safe

5 lessons

 

 

 

Term 3.2

 

The world of drugs

6 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R3c

The conventions of courtesy and manners.

R3e

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

R2a

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

R2c

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

R4b

The same principles apply to online relationships as to face to face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous.

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

H2c

How to consider the effect of their online actions on others and know how to recognize and display respectful behavior online and the importance of keeping personal information private.

To know that choices have consequences

To see ourselves as valued and valuable members of the school community

To recognise what is fair and unfair and the difference between right and wrong

To recognise the difference between wants, needs and rights

 

Learning Objectives:

R1a

That families are important for children growing up because they can give love, security and stability.

R1b

The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives.

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1f

Simple self-care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

To consider some of the changes that take place in people’s lives and reflect on some of the changes in their own lives.

To be able to recognise some of the emotions involved in loss situations and consider what is helpful and unhelpful in such situations.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H1h

That bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

R3f

About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

R4b

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous    

To understand the consequences of racism, teasing, bullying and discrimination.

To understand the feelings and emotions associated with belonging.

 

Learning Objectives:

H4a

What constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content)?

H4b

The principles of planning and preparing a range of healthy meals.

H1e

The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service- based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

H3a

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

H2b

About the benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negatice content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.  

H3b

The importance of building regular exercise into daily and weekly routines and how to achieve this; for example walking or cycling to school, a daily active mile or other forms of regular, vigorous exercise.

H3c

The risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity).

H6c

The importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

To begin to consider the effect of media and peer influences on their lifestyle choices.

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

R4a

That people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

R4b

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous.

R4c

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognize risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them

R4e

How information and data is shared and used online

R5a

What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

R5b

About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe.

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

R5h

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

H2d

Why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example are age restricted

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

 

Learning Objectives:

R5h

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

To develop skills for weighing up the choices involved in and the reasons for and against taking risks.

To develop ways to resist unhelpful pressure to take risks with their health.

To understand that pressure comes in different forms.

 

 

Year 4

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1.1

 

The caring school

and

Feelings, friends and friendships

6 lessons

Term 1.2

 

Respecting the difference between people

6 lessons

 

Term 2.1 and Term 2.2

 

My healthy body

and

Caring for my body

9 lessons

 

Term 3.1

 

Keeping myself safe

5 lessons

 

 

 

Term 3.2

 

The world of drugs

3 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

R3e

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

R2a

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

R2b

The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

R2c

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

R2d

That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

R3b

Practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships.

R4a

That people sometimes behave differently online

R4b

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to-face relationships, including the importance of respect for others including when we are anonymous.

R4d

How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

To learn how to make positive choices.

To know that choices have consequences.

 

Learning Objectives:

R1c

That others’ families, either in school or in the wider world, sometimes look different from their family, but that they should respect those differences and know that other children’s families are also characterised by love and care.

R1d

That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up.

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R3e

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

R3f

About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

R3g

What a stereotype is and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

H1h

That bullying (including cyber bullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

H2c

How to consider the effect of their online actions on others and know how to recognise and display respectful behaviour online and the importance of keeping personal information private.

H2e

That the internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H1a

That mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.

H1e

The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service- based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

H1f

Simple self- care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

H2b

The benefits of rationing time spent online on their own devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others mental and physical wellbeing

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online

H3c

The risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity).

H3d

How and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.

H4c

The characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

H6c

The importance of sufficient good quality sleep for good health and that a lack of sleep can affect weight, mood and ability to learn.

H6d

About dental health and the benefits of good oral hygiene and dental flossing, including regular check-ups at the dentist.

H6e

About personal hygiene and germs including bacteria, viruses, how they are spread and treated, and the importance of handwashing.

H6f

The facts and science relating to allergies, immunisation and vaccination.

H8a

Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

R4c

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognize risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

R5a

What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

R5b

About the concept of privacy and the implications of it for both children and adults; including that it is not always right to keep secrets if they relate to being safe.

R5d

How to respond safely and appropriately to adults they may encounter (in all contexts, including online) whom they do not know.

R5e

How to recognise and report feelings of being unsafe or feeling bad about any adult.

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

R5h

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

H7b

Concepts of basic first aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

To explore the concepts of safety and risk

To explore personal safety indoors and outdoors

To consider sensible road safety

 

Learning Objectives:

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

To increase awareness of the different types of drugs, their effects and dangers.

To revise health and safety skills and awareness of handling medicines.

The increase knowledge of the effects and dangers of smoking.

To explore feelings around smoking and smokers.

To reinforce awareness of peer pressure.

To help children say no to cigarettes.

 

 

 

Year 5

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1.1

 

The caring school

and

Bullying, pressure and risks

6 lessons

Term 1.2

 

Me and my relationships

7 lessons

 

Term 2.1 and 2.2

 

Healthy lifestyles

7 lessons

 

 

 

Term 3.1

 

Growing up – Relationships and r4sponsibilities of puberty

5 lesson

Term 3.2

 

The world of drugs

7 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

R2c

That healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.

R2d

That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

R2e

How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

R3e

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due  respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

R3f

About different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.

R3g

What a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.

R4b

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-to face relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

R5g

How to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so.

R5h

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

H1h

That bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.

H2e

That the internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.

To know it is their right not to be hurt and to live without fear.

 

Learning Objectives:

R1b

The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives.

R1d

That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up.

R1e

That marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong.

R3h

The importance of permission- seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

R3b

Practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships.

R4d

How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

H1d

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

To know what is meant by love.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H1a

That mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.

H1e

The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service- based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

H1f

Simple self- care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

H1i

Where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).

H1j

That it is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough.

H2a

That for most people the internet is an integral part of life and has many benefits.

H2b

The benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.

H3a

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

H3d

How and when to seek support including which adults to speak to in school if they are worried about their health.

R2a

How important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

R4a

That people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

R4c

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

R4e

How information and data is shared and used online.

H2f

How to be a discerning consumer of information online including understanding that information, including that from search engines, is ranked, selected and targeted.

To understand the importance of self-image.

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

H1a

That mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.

H8b

About menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1d

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

H1i

Where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).

H8a

Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.

R3h

The importance of permission- seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

R5a

What sorts of boundaries are appropriate in friendships with peers and others (including in a digital context).

R5c

That each person’s body belongs to them, and the differences between appropriate and inappropriate or unsafe physical, and other, contact.

To understand that feelings can influence behavior and vice versa.

To empathise with the feelings of other people.

 

Learning Objectives:

H4c

The characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

H6a

How to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body.

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

H7b

Concepts of basic first aid, for example dealing with common injuries, including head injuries.

To help children acquire the skills and ideas to enable them to resist early experimentation.

To understand the importance of alcohol on physical and mental health and lifestyles.

To offer a more realistic view of what addiction can mean.

To look at risk assessment linked to personality.

To learn about different reasons why people do or no not drink alcohol.

To reflect on the impact of one’s behavior on others.

 

 

Year 6

 

Autumn Term

Spring Term

Summer Term

Scheme of Work

Term 1.1

 

The caring school

and

Growing up - relationships

7 lessons

Term 1.2

 

Emotions and transition to Secondary School

5 lessons

 

Term 2.1 and 2.2

 

Growing up – responsibilities

6 lessons

 

 

 

Term 3.1

 

Rollercoaster: The ups and downs of puberty

6 lessons

 

 

Term 3.2

 

The world of drugs and keeping safe online

7 lessons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Term 1

Learning Objectives:

R1b

The characteristics of healthy family life, commitment to each other, including in times of difficulty, protection and care for children and other family members, the importance of spending time together and sharing each other’s lives.

R1d

That stable, caring relationships, which may be of different types, are at the heart of happy families, and are important for children’s security as they grow up.

R1e

That marriage represents a formal and legally recognised commitment of two people to each other which is intended to be lifelong.

R2b

The characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.

R2d

That most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.

R2e

How to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

R3a

The importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.

R3d

The importance of self-respect and how this links to their own happiness.

R3e

That in school and in wider society they can expect to be treated with respect by others, and that in turn they should show due  respect to others, including those in positions of authority.

R3h

The importance of permission- seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

R4b

That the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-toface relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous

R4d

How to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

H1d

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

To discuss what we mean by “going out” with someone and what we mean by love.

To learn how to make positive choices.

To know that choices have consequences.

 

Learning Objectives:

H1b

That there is a normal range of emotions (e.g. happiness, sadness, anger, fear, surprise, nervousness) and scale of emotions that all humans experience in relation to different experiences and situations.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

H1d

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

H1i

Where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).

H1f

Simple self- care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

 

Term 2

Learning Objectives:

H1a

That mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.

H1c

How to recognise and talk about their emotions, including having a varied vocabulary of words to use when talking about their own and others’ feelings.

H1d

How to judge whether what they are feeling and how they are behaving is appropriate and proportionate.

H1e

The benefits of physical exercise, time outdoors, community participation, voluntary and service- based activity on mental wellbeing and happiness.

H1f

Simple self- care techniques, including the importance of rest, time spent with friends and family and the benefits of hobbies and interests.

H1j

It is common for people to experience mental ill health. For many people who do, the problems can be resolved if the right support is made available, especially if accessed early enough.

H2b

The benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.

H3a

The characteristics and mental and physical benefits of an active lifestyle.

H3c

The risks associated with an inactive lifestyle (including obesity).

H4a

What constitutes a healthy diet (including understanding calories and other nutritional content)?

H4c

The characteristics of a poor diet and risks associated with unhealthy eating (including, for example, obesity and tooth decay) and other behaviours (e.g. the impact of alcohol on diet or health).

H6a

How to recognise early signs of physical illness, such as weight loss, or unexplained changes to the body.

H6f

The facts and science relating to allergies, immunisation and vaccination.

To explore the types of challenges that occur as children grow.

To help children to face new challenges positively

 

Term 3

Learning Objectives:

R3h

The importance of permission- seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

R5f

How to ask for advice or help for themselves or others, and to keep trying until they are heard.

R5g

How to report concerns or abuse, and the vocabulary and confidence needed to do so.

R5h

Where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

H8a

Key facts about puberty and the changing adolescent body, particularly from age 9 through to age 11, including physical and emotional changes.

H8b

About menstrual wellbeing including the key facts about the menstrual cycle.

 

Learning Objectives:

H5a

The facts about legal and illegal harmful substances and associated risks, including smoking, alcohol use and drug taking.

R5h

where to get advice e.g. family, school and/or other sources.

H7a

How to make a clear and efficient call to emergency services if necessary.

H2a

That for most people the internet is an integral part of life and has many benefits.

H2b

The benefits of rationing time spent online, the risks of excessive time spent on electronic devices and the impact of positive and negative content online on their own and others’ mental and physical wellbeing.

H2d

Why social media, some computer games and online gaming, for example, are age restricted.

H2e

The internet can also be a negative place where online abuse, trolling, bullying and harassment can take place, which can have a negative impact on mental health.

H2g

Where and how to report concerns and get support with issues online.

R4a

That people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.

R4c

The rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.

To understand about the laws on drugs, alcohol and tobacco and about reasons for having such laws

To know how to take part in a discussion or debate

To consider other people’s opinions and a range of relevant factors when making a decision

To develop skills and awareness for dealing with drug related situations

To develop and practice strategies for resisting peer pressure

 

Below you will find example lessons for each year group:

 

 

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